Bruker

+1 (800) 715-8440

Bruker AFM Probes Announcements » AFM Webinars and AFM Videos

The Powerful Diversity of the AFM Probe

This webinar explains how the AFM probe’s key specifications effect its performance, and determine its suitability for a particular application. With this tutorial you will be able to better select any AFM probe as well as make better decisions on how to optimize your experiment through the probe characteristics. Basic and advanced issues will be addressed in this fun and informative webinar.

 

WEBINAR: The Powerful Diversity of the AFM Probe

The Powerful Diversity of the AFM Probe

This webinar explains how the AFM probe’s key specifications effect its performance and determine its suitability for a particular application.

Learn how to make better decisions on AFM probe selection and how to optimize your experiment through the characteristics of the probe.  Basic and advanced issues will be addressed in this informative and fun webinar.

Watch the recording on your computer – [Windows Media]

Download the pdf copy

 

Our AFM Webinar Series – Your Free Learning Resource


The Bruker Atomic Force Microscopy Webinar Series is the web’s most consistently informative online learning resource for the global AFM community
. Each presentation offers a unique opportunity for you to interact with one or more of our AFM experts. The broadcast subjects are designed to cover current metrology topics, provide solutions to tough microscopy problems, and offer development ideas for new applications, AFM modes, or techniques.

Attend an upcoming live AFM Webinar broadcast

Visit and use the AFM Webinar Archives

Subscribe today to our Free Learning Resource AFM Webinar e-newsletter!

 

High Speed Imaging while Heating and Cooling

Dynamic heating and cooling AFM measurements can be challenging because the temperature changes can induce considerable drift both in position, and force control. Linked here (http://www.youtube.com/user/BrukerNano) is a video showing a high speed imaging dynamic experiment from 60 C to -2 C. Tip scanning greatly simplifies the temperature control, while low system drift makes possible the stability. PeakForce Tapping (rather than tapping), which “re-zeros” the force every interaction, enables the continuous imaging over the entire temperature range.

The sample is Poly(diethylsiloxane) (PDES). Siloxanes have broad application as greases, lubricants, elastomers and resins. PDES is a liquid crystal at Room Temperature. When heated, PDES transitions into a fully liquid state at it’s isotropization temperature of ~ 60 C. Cooling back down, PDES undergoes two mesomorphic transitions:
Liquid — Liquid Crystal (mesomorphic), Liquid Crystal — Solid Crystal (~ -2 C).

AFM imaging can be used to study the film nano-morphology, and its changes at each phase transition.

Fast Automated AFMs: Easier than SEM?

I have received a number of questions if FastScan (our High Speed AFM) works with ScanAsyst (our Auto-Optimization algorithms). It does – and this video link demonstrates that by showing unattended high speed imaging on a diverse set of challenging samples. (http://www.youtube.com/user/BrukerNano?feature=mhee#p/u/0/7bi2YEgie_k) In the video are several simultaneous views of the experiment showing different elements of the scan, including that no one is “operating” the system, as well as a detail of the scan parameters so you can see them auto-optimize on each sample.

We have put a lot of effort into both of these features and would be interested to hear your comments – particularly if you are an SEM user. At Bruker, and as AFM’ers, we see a lot of advantages of the AFM over SEM, but often hear scientists say the prefer SEM because its faster and easier to use. I hope this video makes them reconsider. . .